SimplyHome’s Jason Ray Honored with Business Leadership Award

SimplyHome is proud to announce that our Chief Development Officer, Jason Ray, has been awarded the 2017 Small Business Leader of the Year Award by the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce.

 

Watch the Video: Jason Ray, 2017 Small Business Leader of the Year

Watch the Video: Jason Ray, 2017 Small Business Leader of the Year

 

SimplyHome’s Jason Ray receives the Small Business Leader of the Year Award. Source: Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce 

 

 

Several of the SimplyHome staff attended the May 15th event (the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Asheville Chamber and Economic Development Coalition), which took place at Asheville’s Omni Grove Park Inn, to see Jason receive the award in person.

 

 

 

SimplyHome’s Customer Service Representative Michelle Russell chats with another attendee at the Annual Meeting of the Chamber of Commerce. Source: Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce 

 

The Small Business Leader of the Year Awards program recognizes two individuals who clearly reflect quality and dedication in the operation of business in the Asheville area and provide leadership accomplishments including innovation, initiative, and civic responsiveness.

Jason Ray is this year’s award recipient in the category of 16-50 employees for his dedication in serving people with integrity and using innovative technology to provide solutions.

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Jason Ray with family and employees of SimplyHome and ISI, Inc.

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Jason and Jayme Ray pose for a picture at the Award Dinner

One Person, A World of Difference: Congratulations to Xia Xiong!

Wisconsin Direct Service Provider of the Year: Xia Xiong

 

When Meg Anderson remembers the beginning of her son Grant’s journey with autism, she uses phrases like “when he was a year old, we lost our son” and “he began to regress into his own world.”

She remembers feeling helpless in the face of Grant’s challenges, behaviors, and frequent hospitalizations: “We were at the end of our rope. We were exhausted. We had nowhere to turn.”

But one day a county support worker was able to create some solutions for Grant’s needs, by helping him move into a shift foster home with an amazing staff of caregivers.

As a parent, Meg felt that this was all she could hope for. She was grateful and pleased with the solutions that allowed her son to be safe and cared for: “As a parent, there is nothing more vulnerable than putting your special needs child in the care of others. Nothing.”

One member of the caregiving staff, Xia Xiong, went above and beyond to make a difference in Grant’s life.

Xia was recently honored as the Wisconsin DSP of the Year at the 2017 ANCOR Conference, after being nominated by Meg’s family and by Innovative Services as a truly phenomenal DSP.

According to Meg, when Xia became a member of Grant’s team, that’s when everything changed:

“With Xia, I got so much more than I merely hoped for – I got what I dreamed of. I dreamed of staff that would love him and care for his emotional health – even when at times he is hard to love. I dreamed of staff that would look for innovative solutions to problems as they arose – because we knew that there would be problems. I dreamed of staff that would use their creativity and compassion to improve Grant’s quality of life – not just maintain it. I dreamed of staff that would always look at the positive in every situation – even when I was at my lowest.

From her hand-drawn signs around the house helping remind Grant of daily procedures, to her willingness to try new things to better Grant’s life – like taking him swimming or building him his own Advent calendar, to her ability to look past his extreme behaviors to protect his emotional well-being, even when he is at his most unlovable- Xia epitomizes the type of caregiver every parent dreams of for their child. She doesn’t come to “work” every day – she comes to “Grant’s house” and works to make his life the best it can be every single day. She makes the team stronger. She makes life better for Grant – and she makes life better for me because I know my son is not just kept safe, but cherished and protected. She is his advocate and his champion.”

Grant

Xia’s fellow staff at Innovative Services, Inc., have also recognized her outstanding approach to working with her clients:

“Xia was instrumental in preparing Grant to spend a portion of Christmas with his family last year – the first time he had spent any holiday with his family in years. Xia assisted with developing social stories as a learning tool to prepare Grant on what to expect.

Xia has helped Grant to build relationships with his peers at school as well as to manage relationship transitions when his primary educator changed. Outside of school, Xia is involved with Grant in the community, helping him to pursue his interest in swimming.

When Grant began struggling with his perception of law enforcement, Xia was part of the team brainstorming positive interactions in safe environments.

Xia has also developed tremendous relationships with Grant’s family, as well as with the rest of Grant’s care team.

Xia has championed safety protocols within her program, and develop a method for buckling and unbuckling Grant in vehicles to minimize risk – a creative approach which has been recognized as a best practice to be shared with other organizations.

A talented artist, Xia develops chore charts to help Grant as he learns additional responsibilities. She also updates Grant’s communication board and feelings board as his capabilities expand.

When working with Grant, Xia encourages him to be active in his choices. She presents him with new skills to advance, such as lacing his shoes, but keeps an easier alternative of Velcro shoes available, in case he becomes overly frustrated.

Although Xia primarily works with Grant, she is willing to step forward wherever there is a need. She understands everyone needs something, and she takes the time to figure out how to provide for other’s needs, tuning in to each person, asking the right questions, analyzing body language, and searching for the silent signs. She is able to mold herself into the support that each individual needs, even when she is supporting multiple people at once.”

 

According to Rick Bahr, Innovative Services, Inc.’s COO, Xia exemplifies ISI’s core values in her efforts to support people living the lives of their choice: “Xia makes our organization better, and her service has made a difference for the people she supports. Our organization is eternally grateful for Xia and our entire team of direct support professionals, managers and others who redefine what is possible each and every day.”

Congratulations to Xia – thank you for empowering others through your amazing gifts and heart of service!

 

Enjoy this story? Follow SimplyHome’s Facebook page for more stories about empowering people with disabilities to live with greater independence and self-determination!

 

 

Meet Jim – Our Newest Tech Team Member!

Meet Jim

Obsessed with barbecue? The Buffalo Bills? Or just relaxing in the mountains? Meet Jim, the newest member of our SimplyHome tech support team!

We want to welcome Jim and his family to North Carolina — so we sat down and asked him a few questions to help us all get to know him better!

Are you new to Asheville? What is your favorite thing about Asheville so far?

I am new to NC in general — I moved here from New Jersey last week. My favorite thing by far is simply the mountains.

What’s your favorite place you’ve ever lived? 

Santa Monica, CA was most likely my favorite place to live. But it turned out I like it much more to visit instead of live.

When you aren’t working, how do you like to spend your time?

Following my Buffalo Bills very closely.  I’m anxious to get into some serious BBQ’ing and hiking as well.

What’s been the best thing about your first week at SimplyHome? 

The people. It seems like a great team — more like a family.

How do you define success?

I feel like ‘success’ is always evolving.  Success to me is simply happiness.

What is the strangest job you’ve ever had? Do you have any unusual skills on your resume?

I used to work for LG Iris, supporting and building Iris Recognition devices.

How did you first learn about SimplyHome? 

I was on an exploratory vacation down in North Carolina, checking out the area for a potential move.  I spotted SimplyHome on Indeed.com and here we are!

Welcome to the SimplyHome family, Jim!

Stay up to date with the latest from SimplyHome – Like our Facebook page!

 

Introducing Jessica – Our Newest Customer Service Expert!

Meet Jessica

An expert on bullets? A former resident of Kenya? Or a homebody? Meet Jessica, the newest member of our Customer Service team at SimplyHome.

Jessica has already made a big impact and has proven herself to be a quick learner and excellent team player! We sat down with Jessica to ask her a few questions about herself.

Are you new to Asheville? What is your favorite thing about Asheville so far?

I have been here about three years, although I do still refer to myself as being new to the area. I think my favorite thing here is how active everyone is.

Whether it’s with animals, the outdoors, charity work, or the breweries, everyone seems to have a “thing” that gets them out of the house and into the community. As a natural homebody, it inspires me to stretch my comfort zone and get involved.

What’s your favorite place you’ve ever lived?

Kakamega, Kenya

When you aren’t working, how do you like to spend your time?

Either at home with my cats, or out at a pub with friends.

What is the strangest/oddest job you have ever had? Do you have any unusual skills on your resume?

I spent a summer inspecting bullets. They were re-packed shells used by a local police department for practice on the range.

What’s been the best thing about your first week at SimplyHome?

Everyone has been so sweet and so welcoming, really making this an easy transition for me.

How do you define success?

I’d define success with another hard-to-define word: Happiness. Being successful is being happy – Loving where you live, having the freedom, both in finances and time, to be with friends or family, traveling, and loving what you do so that it doesn’t feel like ‘work’.

Welcome to the SimplyHome family, Jessica!

Stay up to date with the latest from SimplyHome – Like our Facebook page!

A Hero’s Fight for Independence: Meet Charles

 

Happy (3)A Life of Adventure

From jumping out of planes to ministering to soldiers who are dealing with the realities of war, Reverend Charles Pittman has lived a life characterized by courage and devotion.

Now retired from being a United Methodist minister, Charles received his first church appointment at only 19 years old. During his 48 years of ministry, he also served on active duty as an Army chaplain in Ethiopia and Thailand. Upon returning to the United States, he served in the Alabama-West Florida Conference as an ordained minister.

Later in life, Charles was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, which the VA says is a direct result of spinal trauma during his time in the military. Due to the damage to his spinal cord, he has limited mobility. Now a resident of Brooks-Howell Home, Charles receives occupational therapy (OT) as part of his support needs. The OT Assistant who works with Charles at Brooks-Howell realized that Charles’ support needs could be best addressed by a combination of natural supports, assistive technology, and community relationships.

Connecting with Support

Accustomed to fighting for freedom, Charles was determined not to let his disability take his own independence. He longed to be more active and mobile throughout the Brooks-Howell community. Through the No Place Like Home program, Charles received an iPad that was mounted on his wheelchair. His new tablet gives him more freedom to move around the community and to connect with friends and family through his touchscreen tablet.

“I like to go out in the sunshine. With my iPad, I can listen to music. It has been a great help to me because I can use it on the go. I’m not bound to my old computer in my room all the time,” said Charles.

SimplyHome, Community Homes®, and Eblen Charities founded the No Place Like Home program with the mission of ensuring that Veterans and their caregivers have the opportunity to access technology that will support their independence and create a new sense of freedom. Nothing can replace being independent and feeling at home, especially for Veterans who have had to leave home to serve their country and who, like Charles, may be living with disabilities as a result of their service.

Get Assistance; Give Assistance

The No Place Like Home program offers new and refurbished systems to disabled Veterans anywhere in the United States. If you would like to learn more about how you can access technology, please email info@simply-home.com or call 1.877.684.3581.

Make a Donation -Whether you would like to make a monetary contribution to the program or donate your system, your support will empower a Veteran to live a life on their terms.

About Eblen Charities

Founded in 1991, Eblen Charities is a non-profit organization whose outreach through its numerous programs has helped thousands of families each year with medical and emergency assistance. Eblen Charities is based in Western North Carolina and offers more than 70 programs to assist families in a variety of categories, such as health, housing, energy, education, and emergency assistance.

About Brooks-Howell Home

Brooks-Howell is a nonprofit, charitable Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) located in Asheville, North Carolina, and supported by United Methodist Women of the United Methodist Church. Originally established as a retirement home for United Methodist deaconesses and missionaries, it has evolved into a community that includes local residents from Western North Carolina, clergy and spouses and service personnel from other denominations.

Top 10 Ways to Embrace More Person-Centered Language

Does Language Matter

It’s 2017, and the language we choose — in particular, the terms we use to describe people who differ from us — has never seemed more important. Every day seems to bring another news story about cultural and social divides.

Language, however, does not only create barriers — it can also build bridges. That’s why we are taking time to revisit the idea of language being person-centered, especially as we continue to work with people in the disability community.

Want to use empowering, respectful language? Here are ten ways to make your language more person-centered (besides, of course, simply using a person’s name!).

 

10. Take time to eliminate outdated and offensive words from your vocabulary.

Some of the terms used to describe people with disabilities are outdated, offensive, and considered slang. Need some examples? Here is a great place to start: Terms to Avoid When Writing About Disability.

 

9. Avoid using the language of disability to describe potentially negative traits.

When people in our culture feel that there is a slowness in understanding something, they often describe ourselves or others as “retarded.” Don’t understand what the big deal is? Read more: Eliminating the R-word.

When we feel that someone is distracted or not very focused on a task, we may describe them as being a “spaz.” In the United States, many people do not realize that this term is derived from the word “spastic” – an alternation in muscle tone that is seen forms of cerebral palsy. In other English-speaking countries, however, both words are used as derogatory terms for people with disabilities.  Read more: The origin of “spaz.”

When we use disability-related language to describe negative traits, we promote the view that people with disabilities are somehow defective or abnormal, a view that contributes to the isolation, oppression, and maltreatment of people with disabilities.

 

8. Take time to understand why individuals may prefer person-first language (PFL) over identity-first language (IFL), or vice versa.

The theory behind person-first language (PFL)—saying “a person with a developmental disability” rather than “disabled person,” or a “person with quadriplegia” rather than “a quadriplegic” – is that it emphasizes the person, not the disability: “By placing the person first, the disability is no longer the primary, defining characteristic of an individual, but one of several aspects of the whole person.” Continue reading about PFL.

While it’s important to be familiar with PFL, keep in mind that many individuals prefer identity-first language (IFL). In identity-first language, “disabled” is a “perfectly acceptable way for a person to identify,” because PFL may unintentionally create negative attitudes:

“Consider how PFL intentionally separates a person from their disability. Although this supposedly acknowledges personhood, it also implies that “disability” and “disabled” are negative, derogatory words. In other words, disability is something society believes a person should try to dissociate from if they want to be considered a whole person. This makes it seem as though being disabled is something of which you should be ashamed. PFL essentially buys into the stigma it claims to be fighting.”

-Emily Ladau at Think Inclusive

Two examples of communities that generally tend to prefer IFL are the Autistic Community and the Deaf Community. Many individuals in the Deaf Community capitalize the “D” in deaf to indicate being Deaf as a culture and identity. Read more about IFL.

 

7. Recognize cultural assumptions: The Religious Model

In the United States, our language is deeply affected by four major models of understanding disability: the religious, the medical, the educational, and the social.

The religious (or superstitious) model of disability gave rise to phrases like “afflicted with” or “stricken by” or “suffers from” a disability – reflecting a belief that disability somehow resulted from divine judgment or that the person was a victim or somehow morally deviant.

This way of thinking has also contributed to the devaluing, oppression, and isolation of people with disabilities. These terms also assume that a person with a disability is suffering or does not have a high quality of life. Read more about the Religious Model.

 

6. Recognize cultural assumptions: The Medical Model

The medical model of understanding disability promotes language that sees people with disabilities as “patients” with a “sickness” or “disease” that needs to be “cured.”

This way of talking about disability has also contributed to the isolation and oppression of people with disabilities, because disability is labelled as contagious or dangerous. Again, there is an assumption that a person with a disability is suffering or is a victim. Read more about the Medical Model.

 

5. Recognize cultural assumptions: The Educational Model

The educational model tends to promote language that sees people with disabilities as needing supports or assistance to become more like “the rest of us.” This view values or devalues people based on their capacity to adapt, “promotes low expectations of people with disabilities, and assumes unequal relationships.” Read more about the Educational Model.

This way of understanding disability often contributes to more isolation and the loss of rights, particularly in academic and professional settings. This view of disability also leads others to assume a patronizing role of “helpful teacher or parent” around people with disabilities.

 

4. Strive to understand the Social Model of understanding disability.

In contrast to the models above, the Social Model views disability as a mismatch between a person’s traits and their environment, and teaches that human culture turns natural traits into disabilities. A person’s disability can “become less severe without anything about their brain or abilities changing, if their environment accommodates their needs.” Read more about the Social Model.

This model of disability places the need for adaptation not on the individual with the disability, but on the environment and culture.

 

3. Re-examine the stereotypes our culture promotes about disability.

How many times have you seen a person with disability portrayed on television as inspirational? Or as dangerous to others? Or as a person without any flaws?

Laurie Block, in her article Stereotypes About People with Disabilities, describes six common stereotypes to be aware of. She describes one such stereotype as the idea that a person with a disability is a “superhuman,” triumphing over adversity in a way that serves as an example to others. Another stereotype is that people with disabilities are “holy innocents with special grace, with the function of inspiring others to value life.”

 

2. Choose to care about the preferences of other people, rather than just caring that you are “correct.”

In the end, our attitudes are more important than our choice of language:

“While terminology is important in shaping viewpoints, attitudes are even more important. Most people with disabilities are less offended by occasional outdated terminology than by obvious paternalistic or patronizing attitudes … Sincere respect and equality are easily recognized.” (Read more from Disability Info)

Language that is respectful IS possible – but only if we are willing to slow down, examine our terminology, learn to be better listeners, and transform our own attitudes.  Not sure where to start? If possible, ask the people with disabilities who are already present in your life, and then start listening. A commitment to listening demonstrates willingness to put another person’s preferences, desires, and priorities first.

 

1. Remember that language is more powerful than we can imagine. 

During the worst eras of disability history, people who did not have disabilities chose terminology – usually words referring to inanimate objects—to describe people with disabilities, in order to dehumanize or separate them from the rest of society.

During the 21st century in the United States, people with disabilities were labelled as “undesirables,” “morons,” “degenerate,” “defective,” “lunatics,” “idiots,” “unfit,” and “feeble-minded.” These dehumanizing and objectifying terms were used to justify mass sterilization, institutionalization, oppression, and murder. During the eugenics era, the United States was a principal actor in promoting the “perfection of the race” through these forms of oppression.

These eras of history should compel us to pay closer attention to our language and our attitudes. If we do not know why we have so many conversations about language and terminology, and if we do not educate ourselves on disability history, we will not understand the power of language, and we will be at risk of repeating many terrible mistakes as a culture. What we teach our children and how we expect others to speak about disability can deeply affect every aspect of life, from access to a life in community to access to a voting booth or civil rights.

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Lastly, don’t forget: One of the most empowering, person-centered uses of language is to simply use a person’s name. 

 

For further reading:

Learn more about identity-first language and person-first language:

Learn about using more respectful, empowering language:

Learn more about the different models of understanding disability:

Challenge your own assumptions + visit important moments in disability history:

Fellow Technology Leader Therap features SimplyHome and CLC in New Video

SimplyHome is delighted to be featured in Therap’s newest video, which highlights the role of assistive technology in providing state-of-the-art, affordable, and person-centered care.

The Charles Lea Center in Spartanburg, SC has pioneered the implementation of technology in their organization, one of the first in South Carolina, both through Therap (a provider of electronic record keeping) and through SimplyHome’s assistive technology systems, in order to support CLC’s residents, care staff, and administration.

Charles Lea Staff Member Shanena R.The video highlights the role of technology by interviewing Charles Lea staff and South Carolina policymakers. Here are two of our favorite quotes from the interviews:

“Technology gives individuals both the freedom they are capable of, and the support they need.”

 

“The technology allowed staff to spend more quality time with individuals.”

 

What else are our partners saying about using SimplyHome technology? Watch the video to find out! For the full video, featuring the Charles Lea Center, SimplyHome, and Therap technology, click here.

 

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Supporting Children with Technology-Based Solutions

GROWING THE SKILLS OF INDEPENDENCE

Smart-home technology: It’s not just for adults! Smart technology can be extremely beneficial to children, providing them with natural supports. Developing independent living skills from a young age prepares children for the transition to adulthood and community-based living. Assistive technology can create opportunities for children to learn to be more independent while supporting their health and safety.

“The technology has been such a blessing. As a single parent, it was difficult for me to monitor Anissa round the clock. Now I can be on the opposite side of the house from Anissa and know if she goes into the kitchen or leaves the house in search of food,” says Janet Smith, mother of Anissa, a teenager with developmental disabilities.

MEET ANISSA

Like most teenagers, Anissa wants to have more independence at home and in the community. With her diagnoses of Prader-Willi syndrome and developmental disabilities, however, Anissa has needed intensive monitoring to keep her healthy and safe. When her mother first contacted us, she was supervising Anissa around the clock so that she didn’t overeat or leave the home in search of food.

Anissa spent 6 months at a Prader-Willi treatment facility where she was able to learn many life skills to help her manage her behavior and weight. When it was time to return home, her mother and the care coordinator contacted SimplyHome in search of ways to encourage Anissa to continue to make good decisions.

Through the assessment with SimplyHome, Janet decided that door sensors, a bed pressure pad, and a few motion sensors would provide the assurance the family needed while supporting Anissa’s independence. The sensor-based technology not only sends alerts to Janet’s cell phone, but also provides audible notifications within the home.

OUTCOMES FOR ANISSA & HER FAMILY:

Anissa soon learned that when the system created alerts, her family would come check on her. As a result, she learned to redirect her own behavior, by returning to bed when she needs to and not leaving the home without supervision. Her mother notes that with the technology, the family no longer takes shifts to sit up at night, and as a result, her mother has been able to go back to work.

Mother and daughter

For Anissa to be more independent, the family wanted to teach her skills regarding:

  • Self-control related to eating outside of mealtime routines
  • Staying upstairs at night
  • Visiting relatives across the street by herself

Anissa’s system was designed to include motion sensors, a bed pressure pad and door sensors to:

  • Capture movement in certain areas of the home after school and at night
  • Help prevent ingress and egress during early morning and late night hours
  • Alert her and her family if she did not return to bed at night within a certain timeframe

The SimplyHome technology sequences activate only at certain times of day:

  • When Anissa is home
  • When Anissa needs a “teachable moment” to address or re-direct her behaviors
  • When Anissa’s safety requires natural support from family

Though Anissa is still a teenager, Anissa’s family is focused on her future, planning for her success as an adult. As Janet says, “We know we are not going to be around forever. If we don’t start supporting Anissa’s independence now, then she won’t have as many choices when she’s an adult.”

 

To find out more about SimplyHome technology, and how it can support the independent living skills of children and adults, contact us by requesting a free assessment.

 

 

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Sensors Harness Skills for Independence at UCP-NYC

UCP-NYC Image 1SimplyHome is pleased to announce our work with UCP-NYC to incorporate our customized assistive technology services to promote more independent living for residents with United Cerebral Palsy – NYC. UCP-NYC is the leading nonprofit agency in New York City providing direct services, technology and advocacy to children and adults with cerebral palsy and other disabilities.

“It’s My Own Routine”

One UCP-NYC resident, Efrain, uses SimplyHome technologies to increase independence with respect to his health. He uses Telehealth devices that record his blood sugar and blood pressure levels, and each device notifies staff if those levels exceed set parameters.

Efrain also uses a medication dispenser, which allows him to start his day and take medication without assistance from staff.  “I like just getting up and being able to get going,” said Efrain. “It’s my own routine, I don’t have to wait for staff.”

Read more: UCP-NYC’s full article.

 

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Top 5 Assistive Technology Resources

Top 5 assistivetechnology resources

Knowing where to find assistive technology resources can be daunting. Whether you are a family member, care provider, grandparent, parent – Where do you even begin? How do you know what works?

We’ve identified a list of the top go-to sources for individuals with disabilities wanting to stay informed about assistive technology resources available to them.

 

#1 The Arc’s Tech Toolbox

Tech ToolboxWhy we love it: It’s exactly what the name reads – A toolbox. Full of products and websites all centered around serving individuals with disabilities. You can even customize your list  by using a few key words to be geared towards independent living, a job, health, interpersonal relationships, or communication, to name a few.

“We have learned that it is challenging to find products that are a good fit for the diverse range of needs and goals of those in our community. To solve this, Tech Toolbox™ provides our community with a user-friendly, easy-to-search online space for sharing information about technology products. Anyone can add a tool to the Tech Toolbox™. And, anyone can rate or review a tool. Plus, you can ask questions about how to use a tool and answer the questions that others ask.”

 

#2 AT Smackdown

AT Expo

Why we love it: A byproduct of the 2016 Adirondack AT Expo, attendees added some of their favorite assistive technology resources. The list ranges from Bookshare to Tots ‘n Tech.


#3 The Mighty

 The MightyWhy we love it: In the words of The Mighty, “We publish real stories by real people facing real challenges. We are building a brand and a community around them. Having a disability or disease doesn’t have to be isolating. That’s why The Mighty exists.”  Their stories not only include developmental and physical disabilities, but also mental health issues.

 

#4 Disability Scoop

 disability scoopWhy we love it: Disability Scoop is the nation’s largest news organization devoted to covering developmental disabilities. Stories cover autism, intellectual disability, cerebral palsy, down syndrome and others. A recent story discusses a new regulation requiring movie theaters to further accommodate individuals with disabilities. Another provides an update on a tracking device for children with developmental disabilities getting one step closer to becoming law.

 

#5 Access and Inclusion Through Technology

Access and InclusionWhy we love it: It’s global news. Don’t have enough time to read an article? The site provides images and videos specific to accessible technology, similar to a social media feed. It also breaks out topics into categories such as Innovation, Leisure, Health and Social.  One such article highlights new technology in videos, including one about a computer mouse that can be controlled by an individual’s head movements.

 

Want to learn more about SimplyHome Technology?

Contact us for a free assessment!

 

 

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